Sale of Mount Hill Mission provides four charities with a cash lifeline

September 07 2016

THE sale of a community church in Hanham has meant seven charities have each benefited from a £34,000 donation.

THE sale of a community church in Hanham has meant seven charities have each benefited from a £34,000 donation.
One hundred years after it opened, the Mount Hill Mission Church in Granny’s Lane, Hanham, closed at the end of 2015 after its congregation continued to steadily decrease, but local and national charities have shared the proceeds after its sale this summer for £206,000.
Jessie May, St Peter’s Hospice, The Salvation Army on Two Mile Hill, Macmillan Cancer Support, Cancer Research and the British Heart Institute all thanked trustees at the church for their generous donation.
Jessie May, which provides care within the home for terminally ill children in Bristol, Bath, South Gloucestershire, North Somerset and Wiltshire, will use the donation to fund new Jessie May nurse Claire Matson, from Hanham, for a whole year.
Jessie May head of fundraising Julian Withers said: “We were absolutely bowled over by the generous donation from the trustees at Mount Hill Mission Church, which came completely out of the blue for us.
“The church has been a staple of the community in Hanham for decades and it will be sorely missed by many but this donation means the church will continue to help the community for years to come.
“We are going to use the donation to fund a new Jessie May nurse, Claire, for a year. Claire will have a caseload of children and families to care for in the local area and will provide medical, emotional and respite support to families who really need it.
“We can’t thank Ted and Olive Denning, Sue Veale and the rest of the trustees enough.”
Jessie May Trust, based at the Kingswod Foundation in Britannia Road, is a charity close to many local people’s hearts.  It costs around £1,000,000 to provide this care yearly and, as the charity is almost entirely dependent on public support, donations like this are essential.
For more information on the work of Jessie May visit www.jessiemay.org.uk